Andrew’s Review of www.feedscrub.com

The first thing I notice about feedscrub is the animated RSS feed. It’s an exciting and playful visual that immediately orients me to think about RSS. I then read the copy: Keep your feeds squeaky clean! Hmm, what does that mean? The bullet points below make it super simple to get the point. Lastly, the […]

The first thing I notice about feedscrub is the animated RSS feed. It’s an exciting and playful visual that immediately orients me to think about RSS. I then read the copy: Keep your feeds squeaky clean! Hmm, what does that mean? The bullet points below make it super simple to get the point. Lastly, the signup form appears on the right. This is a wonderful layout because it pulls my eye from the left to the center and then right to the signup form.

What We Like

Feedscrub offers a comprehensive video tutorial to get users started using feedscrub with Google reader. There’s little left to want in this department. After creating an account, this allows me to integrate feedscrub with my life and get back to reading my feeds. It also helps to wrap your mind around how they intend for you to use the service.

The visual design and site-navigation is clear and intuitive. My eye knows where to look for important functions.

What Confuses Us

I find very little confusing about the Feedscrub service. If I had to nitpick, I would say that the name “Control Panel” isn’t the best choice of words, as this is the member area of the site and let’s you manage your feeds. Secondly, I would say that it’s difficult to figure out how to logout of the service. More specifically, the top navigation serves two purposes: learn about the feedscrub service and manage your current user session. This is disorienting.

Lastly, I would suggest what “filter smartness” means. It’s sort of ambiguous what a 100% smart filter would do for me, as a user.

Suggestions

Feedscrub is an extremely simple and intuitive service. For people who already digest their content using RSS Feeds, it’s a breeze to setup and make use of the service. Unfortunately, I’m not the ideal user of this service: I don’t use my RSS reader nearly as often enough to make this service useful to me—I mainly read books.

Overall, though, feedscrub doesn’t confuse me. The service is extremely straightforward, and has enormous potential. By leveraging its network, the service could suggest related feeds, making feedscrub infinitely valuable. Services like this will be invaluable in the future for helping users digest the ever-increasing amount of content on the Internet.

  • Explain your foundation — Feedscrub essentially provides a customizable spam-filter for your RSS Feeds. However, many Internet users don’t use RSS feeds, take spam-filters for granted, and have no interest in customizing them. Explain what these technologies are and what they mean for potential users.
  • Focus Attention — I would suggest reducing the contrast of the right column. As it presently stands it draws more attention than it deserves.
  • Design for familiarity — If the service becomes more complex, consider designing your service so that it more closely resembles an RSS reader (ie: Google Reader). This would allow users to get up to speed more quickly.

About the Author

Andrew Maier

Andrew is a lifelong student of the design community, who co-founded the design publication UX Booth in 2008 to share his journey. He currently serves as its Editor-in-Chief. When he's not heading user-centered design initiatives for clients, Andrew dabbles in civic design. He lives in Seattle's Capitol Hill neighborhood.

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