Universal design plans for perceivable, operable, understandable, and robust content and services. It helps ensure that our ideas are made available to the largest audience possible.

Designing for Dyslexia (Part 2) Designing for Dyslexia (Part 2)

Universal design strives to improve usability for both users with and without disabilities. In this, part 2 of Designing for Dyslexia, Andrew Zusman identifies how the principles of universal design can be applied to our work on the web.

Designing for Dyslexia (Part 1) Designing for Dyslexia (Part 1)

As designers, we think daily about the challenges our users may face, and choose the right best practices and patterns to help them. This week, UX designer Andrew Zusman introduces us to a unique challenge faced by dyslexics around the world: the challenge of not recognizing the patterns that seem so obvious to many of us.

The Sound of One Hand Typing The Sound of One Hand Typing

For better or worse, the keyboard – a primarily two-handed device – still largely defines how people interact with computers. Andrew Zusman provides a compelling account of how people with one-hand make use of computers and the opportunities this affords to designers.

Design for Readability Design for Readability

Have we designed ourselves into a box? Content Strategist Matt Herron explains the evolution of the "standard" content display model as well as what designers can do to improve their reader's experience.